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Search Results 0 to 45 of about 46 (some duplicates have been removed)
in mississippi to senator john stennis. in the presidential party were bob haldeman and john ehrlichman. >> we were on air force one. we were going off to dedicate a john stennis memorial rocket launcher or something in mississippi. and i'm standing on the flight deck, and it occurred to me for about 30 seconds that i could crash this airplane and that would put an end to everybody's problems. mine, nixon's and haldeman's, everybody who was aboard. i stepped off that airplane, and usually the drill is richard nixon steps off the airplane and all the cameras click away and all that. he got off and nobody paid any attention to him. i got off and boy, they were all taking morgue shots. >> in the very last conversation i had with him there, we were talking about this break-in, in california. the elsberg psychiatrist break-in. and he said, i didn't know about that, did i? and i had to indicate to him that he did know about it. >> that, of course, is a totally out of our -- have you ever heard of this? >> yes, sir. >> i never heard of it, john. i should have been told about that, shouldn't i? >> i'm
carolina, north carolina, texas, mississippi, colorado. i don't know, pretty red states. unfriendliest, new jersey, california, michigan. >> liberal, liberal. >> go to mississippi for vacation. >> oakland is a beautiful city that is rotten. it is rotten because of liberal policy. >> i want to agree with my colleague here from wherever he is from. you are right. if you look at just the crime rates i would bet you the crime rates up against you would find a direct correlation. >> and economic freedom. if you look at a person's ability to start a business and sustain. if you go to places like in the top ten you will have that opportunity plus i think the weather is great in sonoma, california. >> the weather is great in oakland. >> it is because it is unfriendly. >> right to work states. no taxation. >> that's what they stop and think about because they are happier. they don't pay taxes. they don't have to pay union dues. >> can you blame detroit for being unfriendly? >> i wouldn't want there to be a city. >> i wouldn't want to live there. also, albany has the state government of new york. so
a burn in mississippi. people are not being hung in mississippi any more. there's racism there, no doubt. there's racism in boston. when you went through those periods, i went through them in boston, i was amazed how much the white community were really outraged in boston. but let's keep in mind the tenor of the times you're born in. these kids today are not born at a time when there's racial tension. >> still, the leader of the senate. >> i understand that. >> president obama noted in his remarks when he made in the white house press briefing room at the end of the trayvon martin trial, or the george zimmerman trial, about the killing of trayvon martin, he said his daughters, sasha and malia don't talk this way. we learn from previous experiences. what i think is concerning is how exacerbated the administration makes these. partly because we pay attention to what they say, we're looking for any signal, we want the president to bring us together and it actually hasn't happened. maybe that's the fault of those who would oppose him on his policies. somehow i don't -- i actually can't get m
of the mississippi river, but the southeast is getting too much rain. lhat will mean higher food bills, and here's manuel bojorquz. >> can rained again in cordell, georgia, they call themselves the water capital of the world. dell,renshaw has grown them here for 30 years. >> it's the wettest year i've seen. >> reporter: rainfall totals in many parts of the southeast are nchenches above normal. produce that grows close to the neound or on vines have been heavily damaged. waterlogged melons here, split open, rot or lose flavor. law you can tell? >> you see is that brown around the edge of it? that water just running off? >> reporter: half of crenshaw's crop is ruined. se thinks he's facing $1 million n losses. in a drought, you can irrigate. >> right. ut weporter: but when you have this much rain what, can you do? >> there's nothing you can do. you can't take the water away. >> reporter: the melons that aren't any good end up at packing houses like the ones thed by danny wilcher. july is supposed to be peak season. r. we shut down for two weeks. >> reporter: and that hasn't happened in how long? >
george. >>, in mississippi, in alabama, people were struggling to have the right to citizenship, the right to vote, the right to public accommodations. people were being jailed and this was a culmination of those efforts to come to washington and petition the federal government to intervene and insure that in fact all citizens have equal treatment. >> annie, you were there, too, 50 years ago. again, you were there today for the march today. how did being there in 1963 impact who you became no. life. i was 17, and i had a summer job. i was on my way to college and i realized that there were people all over the country who i was aworking class examined kid of immigrant parents but still had this genetic advantage and needed to go down and say i'm standing with everyone else, because it was so important. i went into college thinking i would be a high school english teacher and i said no, i needed to go into journalism to stand up, bear witness and maybe make a difference. >> martha, you've written about the ways in which the women were at times overlooked. there was only one woman
destruction in mississippi and louisiana, and claimed so many lives in and around the city of new orleans. august 29th, 2005, forever known as the day the levees broke. fast forward to today and though there's been a massive rebuilding effort, some areas still remain abandoned. but new neighborhoods are popping up, and officials say 80% of the prestorm population has returned. >>> now, the picture of a day that might be a first at the vatican. take a look at pope francis, who's been quite active on twitter. there he is smiling and posing for a sophie, a group of young visitors, inside st.peter's basilica. the people in the group snapping pictures of themselves on a cell phone. >>> we've got good news to report tonight. when folks return for their end of summer break on labor day, a good friend of ours will be coming back to work as well. brian has been given the all-clear from his doctors after knee replacement surgery just over three weeks ago. our own doctor, nancy snyderman, met up with him at the jersey shore. >> i expected a -- may i come back at two weeks? can i push to three? but i
against civil rights. the state of mississippi, which had given fdr something like 95% of the vote gave goldwater 84% in 1964, the guy who participated in the filibuster. >> then the voting rights act of '65 was so important because that changed the face of government in the united states. just like you may have handed the south over to the gop for all those decades, but you really changed -- you changed the united states of america, you know, i think as a result of the better. >> he might have changed party labels but we need to understand that, you know, racism is racism, no matter if it's a democrat or republican. so, the notion that he signed the party away for 30 years, you know, brings me back to the moment of, what's your responsibility of the civil rights leader? that that was a political calculation that lindyn lyndon made. so, yes, this may cost the democratic party, but eventually we believe it's going to benefit the nation. that's where we are today. >> it is interesting -- what it really did, we say it signed the south away for democrats. in a lot of ways it did. but it sor
. this is during a routine dive in mississippi. this is a 66-year-old who was doing a tandem dive. the student is in critical condition with broken bones and a head injury. the owner said the instructor cut away his main parachute and used backup but it's not clear what went wrong. the faa is investigating this along with local authorities. >>> a man who saw a car mow down 13 pedestrians, this is on l.a.'s venice beach. the driver was looking for blood. >> reporter: you see the suspect's car plowing in and swerving around barriers. >> the just drove and took that barrier down and bodies were scattering and flying in the air and people were screaming and it was absolute mayhem. >> reporter: a second camera angle shows the driver getting out casing the boardwalk. ghets back in and floors it. >> he has to have pressed foot to the gas because tires started screeching. he was looking for blood. that guy's intention was to kill people. >> reporter: an italian tourist on her honeymoon was killed and 11 others injured in a scene a quarter mile long. the suspect is nathan campbell of los angeles. just
who don't know who emmett till is. a 14-year-old black kid in mississippi, 1955 and flirted with a white woman and a few days later two white racists attacked him and shot him to death. now this is who she is comparing this to, trayvon martin. i feel like oprah diminished her brand here. it was a big missed opportunity for oprah winfrey. i was expecting her to take the high road and elevate the conversation and to bring the country forward and add a little unity here. instead she made this atrocious analogy and i am a little disappointed in oprah. >> that was an awesome chandelier. banned phrase. decimate. did we discuss this in the a block? i must have got 150 tweets telling me exactly what decimate means and that the president was using it incorrectly. i disagree. he was using it correctly. to decimate is to kill every 10th man. so technically 90% of al-qaeda is still in operation. president obama is saying, yes, we have 10% and we have 90% left. that's all i want to do. >> technically that's what he meant. so stop using decimate. >> if we stop using the words you tell us
who had gone to mississippi to visit his family. he was in a store. he made a comment about a white woman and that led to him being picked up by a bunch of racists and murdered. that was the emmitt till reference. >> brutally murdered. >> to say the least. >> shot through the head, thrown into the river. >> all for making a comment about a white woman that was not all that offensive. >> was it fair to to relate the trayvon martin case -- >> i don't think so. till became a symbol for that era and i don't think that was the right example. >> i don't know. i think there will always be a difference of opinion and it will never change, so why don't we just move on. i think oprah can have a lot of fun with us by constantly saying things every day, seeing if we will cover it. like you know what, i don't want mayonnaise on my tuna fish sandwich. then "the five" the next day will go tuna fish, really, oprah, tuna fish and mayonnaise? what is wrong with you! what is happening to you! could this hurt your brand? >> i like mayonnaise! >> i hate tuna fish but love mayonnaise. >> it is weird, yo
to a protest in mississippi, i was 14 years old. and it was scary as hell. my father was arrested over 50 times and i got arrested with him once, myself. my mother would never bail him out. after the third time the sheriffs called, this time they called and said well, your son is with them. they bailed us both out. and i said next year, pop, how about we go to the beach? >> all right, so this is for me, from deborah k., i just wanted to know where did she go to college and what prompted her to be a conservative? >> i went to the university of arizona, bear down, go wildcats, my parents were conservatives, i'm a daughter of the american revolution. i wrote a letter to bill clinton when i was 6 years old, about how our taxes are too high. all right, this is for all of us. this is from tim c. you have just been nominated as ambassador of the united states, congratulations, which country, and why? >> england, because it is the only place i could speak the language. >> brazil, i love their energy policy. >> i love their women. >> of course. >> awesome. >> if i chose a country i wanted to be from, ot
themselves. >> host: on our line for independents. randy in west point, mississippi. >> caller: good morning! >> host: good morning. >> caller: if the ports in savannah, georgia going to be upgraded for the new tanker ships? thank you. >> guest: the the port of savannah is currently in the process of working in the corp. of engineer and the federal government to deepen the savannah river so it will be able to accommodate larger vessel the project is underway in term of that investment and improvement. similarly in gulf port, mississippi. as you know, that port was significantly impacted by katrina a few years ago. as part of the process of rebuilding and revitallyization of the mississippi coastline there's activity involved in terms of improvements and investment in and around the port or gulf port to both revitalize that community that have devastated by the hurricane, but also importantly to be able to handle the new type of vessel that will be transiting in to the gulf of mexico in a few short years. >> we have about fifteen minutes left with our guest. he's the president and chief execu
to him happened in mississippi in 195 5. he was 14. a lot of people see this film and think about our new cycle stand your ground and stop and frisk and trayvon martin and brings up that talking point is there justice right now? really great part in the film where they talk about, you know, the young seizele gaicecil gain. he is saying the law was against us and not on our side. i think trayvon martin's family and other people would feel that way today. >> "the butler" takes a look at the inner workings at the white house in the past. we know oprah has modern day ties to this white house, the obama administration. listen to this. >> look at all of those administrations compared to obama. i mean, obama will stand alone because of what that represented for the country. i was so pleased that during the process of this interview, a white reporter sitting in the very chair you're sitting in saying he didn't realize until seeing this movie the depth of the importance of obama, but seeing that movie in the context of the civil rights movement, now allows him to see, wow, that is really bigger th
's the deal for those of you that don't know, 14-year-old black kid in mississippi, 1955, flirted with a white woman. a few days later, two white racists attacked him, shot him to death. this is who she is comparing trayvon martin. i feel like oprah diminished her brand. it was a missed opportunity. i was expecting her to take the high road and elevate the conversation and bring the country forward and add a little unity here. but instead she made this atrocious analogy and i am a little disappointed in her. >> i will say that was an awesome chandelier. >>> banned phrase. decimate. we discussed it in a block. i must have got 150 tweets telling me exactly what decimate means and that the president was using it incorrectly. i disagree, he was using it correctly. to decimate is to kill every tenth man. 90% of al qaeda is in operation because president obama says we have 10%, 90% left. >> that's technically what he meant. >> using decimate. >> if we stop using the words you tell us not to use, we can't talk any more. >> i want to ban every single word. >> get out. throw to "special report." >> tha
trying, sir, to talk some sense over this proposed government shutdown. mississippi governor phil bryant tells "the new york times," and i'm quoting, we believe in eliminating obama care completely but at some point, perhaps we have to realize that the federal government because of the support of our military, support of our public safety, our infrastructure, wiig have to have a budget." but will senator cruz and his cohort listen? >> well, i don't think we know that yet. look, john mccain is saying the same thing. tom cole who is very conservative who is in the house leadership is saying the same thing. it would be a disaster for the republicans to shut down the government. they did it in 1995. those guys were there. they saw that it was a political train wreck. i think boehner understands this, the house speaker. i think mcconnell understands this, but boehner wants to be called speaker, not ex-speaker. mcconnell faces a primary in kentucky. so i don't think that we can be certain about what's going to happen here. if they do shut down the government and they'll be blamed for it, if th
. met with a famous college basketball team that helped a white university of mississippi team play their first game against african-americans. this of course meeting with some living negro leaguers, the most famous of which is miniminoso. he played in the majors, ron tinsley had some minor league time. but what was interesting about the conversation when it turned to a-rod was this whole issue of these guys seem to have had it. and what's interesting now, you see current players saying the same thing. they're all like, you know what? clean this support up and they're not happy with a-rod heer either. >> tell me your impression of what's going on with this steroid -- first of all, what did they call a performance enhancing drug in your day? coffee? >> coffee. you lucky. and before, we're not making enough to maybe buy one bottle of dom perignon. i remember they used to be tough, people with alcohol and never in my life -- nothing to this day to my life. i never took drugs in my life. not even smoking. before allvy in my mind about how to play tomorrow and i haven't done anything bef
, minnesota, minnesota, georgia, florida. i point out mississippi, minnesota, georgia, and florida. we know the stereotypes that probably are quite true when you look at the food culture of some of those southern states. >> the southeast does struggle. i come from a long line of obesity. i think the real message is it doesn't matter where you live. it doesn't matter if your mother, grandmother, father, aunts, uncles, in my case, they're all obese. that doesn't mean i have to be obese. we're seeing a transition. >> so preschool the study was followed preschoolers. that is such a smart move. that's where it has to happen. >> i want to read the first lady's response to the numbers. she says today's announcement reaffirms my belief that together we are making a real difference in helping kids across the country get a healthier start to life. i see it as a balance of kids. you can play the video games but you can go on your bike. >>> i know it's not always easy to nurse. it was tricky. i had a lifestyle that made it doable for me. so i hope that i'm so glad to see more women nursing. i'm so glad
of him. they gouged out this kid's eye. it was a horrible tragedy in mississippi. >> it's so easy during this time. trayvon martin paralleled to him. you get stuck in that and not allow yourself to move forward and see how far we've come. >> there is no comparison. >> it's a baseless claim. but getting back to her in switzerland, there's a pattern here. in 2005 in paris at a hermes store -- is that how you pronounce it? >> i wear jeans and sneakers. >> the store closed. oprah wants to go shopping. they told her she couldn't. she had a hissy fit and she screamed racism. >> i thought it was true. i remember that story. i remember thinking it was horrible. >> but there's video of it. and there's a statement from the store that said this is what happened. but oprah injected race into it. >> well, again -- >> can't compare trayvon. >> i wasn't there and neither was dineen. >> but you can't compare trayvon. emetil was a rascist, vicious hate crime murder. that's not the same thing. >> a lot of african-americans, not all, certainly not all, but a lot do feel that this is a very modern day versi
this morning. sarah thomas, a mother of three from mississippi, on track now to become the first permanent, female nfl official. she's on the field right now, in fact, with new orleans saints, as they go through training camp, honing skills as she awaits that final word that her dreams will finally come true. in those bold black and white stripes, and hair tucked under that black hat, this official looks exactly like every other one on the field. >> watch yourself right here, 17. little tight. little tight. >> reporter: but 39-year-old sarah thomas, a married mother of three, is on the verge of history. >> are you a tomboy? >> i'm a tomboy. yes, but i'm married with two boys. >> reporter: poised to become the first-ever full-time female official for the national football league. >> there's momma. >> 72, you have to come move up on this. put your guard up. >> individually, i'm a female. there's a lot of things that set us apart individually. race, gender. but collectively, we're out there for the same goal. >> reporter: for almost 16 years of officiating grade school, high school and colleg
on the mississippi, which was not quite as good as what mark twain portrayed in his book, but after doing that for a year, he teamed up with another american of german dissent named ben mast, and together they went to work in a flour mill in st. louis, and they did that for about a year; then they moved to illinois where they worked on a farm for three years, and in 185 p -- 1853 after hearing the great stories about the gold rush in california, they decided to make the move west, and they did this by buying 200 head of livestock driving them from st. louis to california, and turns out that could be a profitable venture things even back then were more expensive in california than they were in st. louis. you could buy a cow or ox for five or ten dollars in st. louis, and the same animal cost $50 or more in california. it was a profitable trip for them. they arrived in dayton, nevada in 1853, and they immediately went to work panning for gold in the carson river the next day. they did this for about three years working gold, operating a sleuth box for mixed results. some days very profitabl
in texas. heat advisories and heat warnings from mississippi up into arkansas, oklahoma, texas. it's not just the air temperature, but the feels like temperature, and it says it will feel like 108, and 107 in shreveport. but you get here in the 70s in new england. 60s in the up of michigan and on into northern minnesota. 90s interior sections of the pacific northwest. the two risk areas for severe weather both in the central plains and also upper midwest and the heat continues on into parts of new mexico. but gorgeous in los angeles today. sunshine, 75. >>> 7:34 on wednesday morning. cloudy start to the day over the go bridge. we have a lot of high and mid levelle clouds, not a lot of fog. updated all morning long. what is going to happen, we'll see the westerly flow, cool ocean air inland. enough of the wind so a fog isn't much of a factor even later tone when it rolls in. 58 degrees in san francisco. 72 in san jose 74 santa teresa. finally seasonal averages monday. >> al, thank you very much. this morning on rossen reports, a new crime targeting women at gas stations. thieves str
. a slight risk of strong storms in the upper mississippi river valley. tomorrow, we're looking at more wet weather moving into the northeast, mid-atlantic states, the upper ohio river valley. western half of the country sunny and hot. the heat extends down near the gulf. down >>> good wednesday morning to you. i'm meteorologist christina loren. temperatures are pretty comfortable out there right now. we are in the upper 50s, low 60s, live look at san jose shows you we still have clouds overhead. that natural ac moving all the way inland this morning, means a cooler afternoon. as a result, 70 degrees. today, in san francisco, a little bit cooler than average and temperatures are going to continue to drop off as we head through the nix couple of days. 87 degrees by thursday. up to 91 degrees on friday. >>> don't forget. get that weather any time you need it. go to the weather channel on cable or weather.com online. >>> in the world of country music it does not get much bigger than dolly parton. she is a legendary singer and song writer and actress and entrepreneur. she shared big news with w
mississippi for five minutes. >> thank you, mr. chairman. i appreciate your interest in my airports but what i want to do is make sure we keep it in the right language. my only -- sensitive personal. it is i do with time and attend a wedding like that in the private sector. it's sensitive security information. and that kind of information, we all agree, is something that is far more serious than someone not showing up for work. now, as important for me in this conversation is whether or not, mr. halinski, you saw the fact that in the contracting with tsa with private contractors, because you do not have the ability to deal with personnel found guilty of that. have you now change the contracting document to tsa to get you to where you need to be? >> yes, sir. we have changed the contract for all the contracts were spp airports, and there is a clause in there that requires them to report any type of misconduct activities of the workforce. and we also require in this new language that if an employee is identified with misconduct, that appropriate action needs to be taken by that company, sir stev
the mississippi river. flash flooding for some of the heavier downpours we're seeing right now. it's a lot about temperatures too, 73 for a high in chicago where the normal high is 83 degrees. we're well into the 100s in parts of texas that will stay the case tomorrow and it'll stay pretty chilly in chicago, 74 degrees with some late day thunderstorms but in the northeast we are starting off a stretch of low humidity, temperatures right around 80 degrees so some areas lucking out with the weather. >> okay, for which we thank you very much, dylan dreyer. >> no one landed the prize in the powerball drawing. it's going to a whopping $400 million. and in today's number ones, the states that spend top dollar on lottery tickets. massachusetts leads the way according to a study last year, average spending, 860 bucks a year per person. georgia second with spending $470. $20 less than third place new york and also beer, let's talk about that coming out on top in a new gallup survey as america's favorite alcoholic beverage. 36% prefer beer. 35% prefer wine and 23% go for hard liquor. >> i told you i didn'
direction. florida, georgia, michigan, mississippi. these are states that have been difficult to target. i think over time you want to see how the numbers do. the concern for some time is these children had about a five-time likelihood of growing up to be obese adults as well. the problem is coming. this is the first time we have seen sustained improvement. >> the states are all over the country. it's not concentrated in one region at all. is there a reason, a cause for h this drop at this point? >> we're not entirely sure. we asked the same question. >> of course. >> i would say this is the kitchen sink mentality. the obesity epidemic, throw everything at the problem to see what sticks. that was good probably. the hard part is trying to figure out what worked. one clue is ta the low income children being affected points to federal subsidy programs as a possible cause, a benefit. wic and food stamp programs have regulated what people can buy to eat. much more healthy buying going on. decrease ing sugary drinks. also breastfeeding. there is a sustained effort. it makes a difference. childre
today in louisiana. i got that. >> it is only mississippi, alabama, three states. >> i said that. >> seriously. i think before -- you have never done that? >> i think the panhandle went all the way to louisiana. he was technically maps. if you look at the maps of your late 18th century map maker. >> i think he is tired. >> there are many other states that embrace those conservative values, the approach that we have taken over the years. i am in one today in florida. you look at south carolina. you look at florida -- >> we're in louisiana. >> i know and i said that. i am in one of those states that reflect those today in louisiana. >> we are here. how great is he? >> i want him to run. >> he just might. >> howard stern. >> i would have been scared to do this interview. >> he was good. judge of "america's got talent" they are across the street at radio city music hall. i asked why he wanted to take the gig. >> i took it because i thought it was fun. i was a viewer of the show. i would judge from my bedroom and would go on the air and say i should be a judge on these shows. i will t
audience he was a kid from chicago who had gone to mississippi to visit his family. he was in a store. he made a comment about white woman. that lead to him being picked up by a punch of color racists and murdered. that was the reference they made. >> brutally murdered. >> brutally murdered to say the least. >> shot in the head and thrown into a river. >> all about making a comment about a white woman that was not that offensive. >> is it fair to relate the trayvon martin case to -- >> i don't think so. till was -- really became a symbol for that era. i don't think that was the right example. >> thoughts? >> i don't know. there will always be a difference of opinion and it will never change. why don't we just move on? i think oprah can have fun with us by constantly saying things every day and seeing if we will cover. it i don't want mayo on my tuna fish sandwich. and then on "the five" the next day we will go, tuna fish? really, oprah? tuna fish? what is wrong with you? what is happening to you? could this hurt your brand? >> i like mayo. >> i hate tuna fish, but i love mayo. >> that's w
in mississippi a couple of miles from the state penitentiary, they have a program that allows prisoners to leave and make $6 per hour processing chickens. they said they have never had a prisoner last more than two days cleaning chickens. that they would rather be in their cells in prison than work in the chicken processing plant because it is such hard, dirty, nasty work. we are seeing the same thing in arizona. picking lettuce, there are no american workers lining up to do those jobs. host of this tweet -- -- host: this tweet -- guest: if there were? oh, well, a secret about immigration, if you wanted to come to the united states and clean a hotel room or work in a service sector that is not agriculture, there is no way for you to come to this country to work. there is especially no way for you to stay. we do not have a visa category that addresses these people. while we do have an agriculture program, it is small and difficult to use and many employers do not use it. in california they say that 70% of agriculture workers are here illegally and only 4% of the total population are using the h2a
to be an issue along the banks especially of the mississippi. for severe storms we're going to see them from southeastern montana to kansas, biggest threat large hail and damaging wind gust. temperature that's a big story. 74 degrees. that's it in chicago. nice and pleasant in the northeast. low humidity and highs around 80. you're watching "morning joe" brewed by starbucks. honey... it's time to go. no. honey, it's too perfect. over a quarter million properties... you'll never want to leave. booking.com booking.yeah vietnam in 1972. [ all ] fort benning, georgia in 1999. [ male announcer ] usaa auto insurance is often handed down from generation to generation. because it offers a superior level of protection and because usaa's commitment to serve military members, veterans, and their families is without equal. begin your legacy, get an auto insurance quote. usaa. we know what it means to serve. where over seventy-five percent of store management started as i'm the next american success story. working for a company hourly associates. there's opportunity here. i can use walmart's education be
on into the upper mississippi river valley. sunny and hot from the gulf coast to the northwest. rain leftover in new england. saturday, kind of wet through the ohio river valley back into the plains. west coast looking fabulous again. sizzling in texas. sunday, sunday, more rain in the mid-atlantic states. the heat continues out west. and a few >>> 9:33. we do havess an overcast sky ov the bay bridge but the golden gate completely clear. show you san jose. a nice, hazy sky here, lots of blue overhead. we have a beautiful day shaping up. the wind is the reason why. even though we have got a nice clear sky in san jose, that cool ocean air is going to continue to move all the way inland. keep our temperatures really comfortable. that means we are expecting 80 inland, 72, bay side, 63 at the coast, today, finally warm up to seasonal averages. >> that's your latest weather. carson? >> i'm going to build something now. thank you, al. >>> are you a weekend warrior who loves to take on new projects? is we've got cool ideas for you that should help you spruce up your home. >> kevin o'connor of this old house
Search Results 0 to 45 of about 46 (some duplicates have been removed)